JANE AUSTEN FESTIVAL AUSTRALIA
12-15 April 2018

Jane Austen Festival Australia is an annual celebration in Canberra where Austen and Napoleonic fans from all over Australia come and indulge themselves in everything Regency - including dancing, music, food, games, archery, fencing, theatre, promenades, grand balls, talks, workshops, costumes and books. This festival is now a regular part of the ACT Heritage Festival, Australian Heritage Week and is supported by the ACT Government, the Australian Costumers Guild and the Earthly Delights Historic Dance Academy. Since its inception in 2008 this little festival has blossomed into one of the most delightful four days anyone could experience each April in an old and beautiful part of Canberra, the Federal capital of Australia.

November 18, 2013

Regency links of the week...





Are Jane Austen's books relevant in today's search for a successful marriage?
http://www.chatelaine.com/health/sex-and-relationships/jane-austens-rules-for-a-successful-marriage/
www.chatelaine.com


20 tickets are sale for the JAFA Friends private bus tour of historical Yass: visit Cooma Cottage, have lunch at George Harcourt Inn and visit the National Museum of Australia Archives in Mitchell to see their collection of Regency garments and tour their storage facilities. Lunch is included in the ticket price.  http://www.janeaustenfestival.com/tickets.html

There are some nice regency-looking lace-up 'vegan' boots at http://amzn.to/19xl2rd

There are some really great projects in this issue - including some gorgeous long regency gloves! http://amzn.to/1f50wGc

http://www.salon.com/2013/11/11/how_to_make_a_jane_austen_reboot_thats_actually_good/

How to make a Jane Austen reboot that’s actually good
www.salon.com
Austen adaptations are everywhere, from "Longbourn" to "Mr. Darcy, Vampyre." A Web series shows how to do it right


Whether it's breakfast at Northanger Abbey, tea and cake at Mansfield Park, or one of Mrs Bennet’s dinners to impress, food is an important theme in Jane Austen’s novels. And now, Austen fans can recreate the dishes featured in the author's works, thanks to new book Dinner with Mr Darcy. Written by Pen Vogler, the editor of Penguin’s Great Food series, the book also features dishes Jane and her family were known to have enjoyed.
How many of you have tried a "Jane Austen" tea? There are so many these days that one wonders how they are able to lay claim to the name.

The Jane Austen Mafia Tea by Adagio Teas — Steepster
steepster.com
Reviews and information for The Jane Austen Mafia tea from Adagio Teas on Steepster, a community of tea lovers.


And if thinking about tea wasn't enough - how many "Jane Austen" songs are there? This site claims to list 100 of them.

Another new release for Jane Austen fans: How to Speak Like Jane Austen and Live Like Elizabeth Bennet – a delightfully inventive interpretation of all things Pride and Prejudice – translates the lively language of Jane Austen and the lovely lifestyle of Elizabeth Bennet into easy-to-embrace guidelines for 21st century living, making it possible to talk like Jane and act like Elizabeth – anytime, anyplace.


Pride & Prejudice, the game has always been popular amongst Australian Jane Austen fans :)http://amzn.to/1bq7X4b


Keen to sew a men's tailcoat for JAFA? Here is a good pattern to use-a men's tailcoat pattern suitable for this period - without the waist seam of late regency and early empire http://amzn.to/1awlPyv


Are you a fan of Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice? If you are, then this Pride & Prejudice Trivia Game is the game for you. With 300 trivia cards, including 8 bonus Jane Austen trivia questions, you will enjoy testing your knowledge of this book to become the Pride and Prejudice Trivia Champion and learning facts you may not remember. Gather all your friends who are fans of Jane Austen and see who can claim the title Pride and Prejudice Trivia Champion!


Download pattern pieces for a Jane Austen Clothespin Doll at http://www.janeausten.co.uk/wp-content/uploads/2011/06/freejapinpattern.pdf


Next year we celebrate 200 years of Mansfield Park. If you have already re-read the novel you may wish to try some of the sequels. http://amzn.to/17pXF8k


Jane Austen 5-Year Journal Looking for a Christmas gift that will last for at least five years? Let the wit and wisdom of Jane Austen guide you throughout the next five years. Each journal page features a memorable quote from the iconic author’s oeuvre that can be revisited each year. Created to help you make a time capsule of your thoughts, simply turn to today’s date and take a few moments to comment on the quote. When you finish the year, move on to the next section. As the years go by, you’ll notice how your commentary evolves.


Another book due out in early December in time for Christmas orders is Jane Austen and the Arts: Elegance, Propriety, and Harmony http://amzn.to/1aBURzL

About the book, from the Rowman & Littlefield website:

Contributions by Jessica Brown; Diane N. Capitani; Christine Colón; Alice Davenport; Deborah Kennedy; Kathryn L. Libin; Kelly McDonald; Belisa Monteiro; Jeffrey Nigro; J. Russell Perkin; Erin J. Smith; Vivasvan Soni; Melora G. Vandersluis and Frederick A. Duquette.

The essays collected in Jane Austen and the Arts; Elegance, Propriety, and Harmony examine Austen’s understanding of the arts, her aesthetic philosophy, and her role as artist. Together, they explore Austen’s connections with Edmund Burke, Adam Smith, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, Madame de Staël, Joanna Baillie, Jean Jacques Rousseau, Mary Anne Schimmelpenninck, and other writers engaged in debates on the sensuous experience and the intellectual judgment of art. Our contributors look at Austen’s engagement with diverse art forms, painting, ballet, drama, poetry, and music, investigating our topic within historically grounded and theoretically nuanced essays. They represent Austen as a writer-thinker reflecting on the nature and practice of artistic creation and considering the social, moral, psychological, and theological functions of art in her fiction. We suggest that Austen knew, modified, and transformed the dominant aesthetic discourses of her era, at times ironically, to her own artistic ends. As a result, a new, and compelling image of Austen emerges, a “portrait of a lady artist” confidently promoting her own distinctly post-enlightenment aesthetic system.

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Table of Contents:

Preface: Jane Austen’s Critique of Aesthetic Judgment by Vivasvan Soni
Introduction by Natasha Duquette and Elisabeth Lenckos

I. The Fine Arts in Austen’s World: Music, Dance, and Portraiture

Ch 1. “Daily Practice, Musical Accomplishment, and the Example of Jane Austen” – Kathryn Libin
Ch 2.”A ‘Reputation for Accomplishment’: Marianne Dashwood and Emma Woodhouse as Artistic Performers” – Kelly McDonald
Ch 3. “Miss Bingley’s Walk: The Aesthetics of Movement in Pride and Prejudice” – Erin Smith
Ch 4. “The Sister Artist: Cassandra Austen’s Portraits of Jane Austen in Art-Historical Context” – Jeffrey Nigro

II. Austen and Romanticism: Female Genius, Gothicism, and Sublimity

Ch 5 – “Portrait of a Lady (Artist): Jane Austen’s Anne Elliot, Madame de Staël’s Corrine, and the Woman of Genius Novel” – Elisabeth Lenckos
Ch 6 – “Jane Austen’s Comic Heroines and the Controversial Pleasures of Wit” – Belisa Monteiro
Ch 7 – “An Adaptable Aesthetic: Eighteenth-Century Landscapes, Ann Radcliffe, and Jane Austen” – Alice Davenport
Ch 8. “Exploring the Transformative Power of Literature: Joanna Baillie, Jane Austen and the Aesthetics of Moral Reform” – Christine Colón
Ch 9. “Jane Austen’s Influence on Stephenie Meyer” – Deborah Kennedy

III. Austen in Political, Social, and Theological Context

Ch 10. “Aesthetics, Politics, and the Interpretation of Mansfield Park” – Russell Perkin
Ch 11. “Reflections on Mirrors: Austen, Rousseau, and Socio-Politics” – Melora Vandersluis
Ch 12. “‘So much novelty and beauty!’: Spacious Reception through an Aesthetic of Restraint in Persuasion” – Jessica Brown
Ch 13. “Augustinian Aesthetics in Jane Austen’s World: God as Artist” – Diane Capitani
Ch 14. “‘Delicacy of Taste’ Redeemed: The Aesthetic Judgments of Austen’s Clergymen Heroes” – Fred and Natasha Duquette

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